Cinecast #27: Look At You Now, (Broken) Flowers In The Window
Tuesday, 09 August 2005 01:00
You  can't leave now, it's time for Cinecast #27.

"Hustle & Flow," "Last Days," "March of the Penguins," "The Beat That My Heart Skipped" ... and now Jim Jarmusch's "Broken Flowers": The summer of 2005 is being saved from mediocrity by independent cinema. "Flowers," starring Bill Murray and an incredible roster of supporting talent (including Jeffrey Wright, Sharon Stone, Jessica Lange and "Six Feet Under's" Frances Conroy), features a surprisingly conventional premise that has ex-ladies man Murray trying to figure out the origin of a mysterious note that claims he's the father of a 19 year-old son. But Jarmusch successfully mines the high concept story for his trademark deadpan laughs and genuine pathos. Fast becoming the go-to guy for indie auteurs, Murray gives another outstanding and subtle performance. Fans of "About Schmidt," "Lost in Translation" and "Sideways" take heed: your middle-aged man-in-crisis movie has arrived.

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Also on the show, Listener Feedback, the Best and Worst Performances of the Year (So Far), and Massacre Theatre presented by ChicagoMixer.com ... Where singles mix and couples emerge.

Music by Waco Brothers courtesy of Bloodshot Records ... Cinecast theme music by Age of the Rifle.

Listen  to Cinecast #27

Cinecast #27
:32-14:24 - Review: "Broken Flowers"
Music: Waco Brothers, "Come A Long Long Way"
15:14-25:17 - Listener Feedback, Worst Performances of the Year (So Far)
Music: Waco Brothers, "Lincoln Town Car"
26:05-32:58 - Best Performances of the Year (So Far)
32:59-36:19 - Massacre Theatre
36:20-38:38 - Top 5 Movies About Marriage Preview

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